JABBERWOCKYLLANFAIRPWLLGWYNGYLLGOGERY
-CHWYRNDROBWLL LLANTYSILIO
-GOGOGOCHIWOCI
Lewis Carroll (Charles Dodgson)version: Peter H. Cole
Twas brillig and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble on the wabe,
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome-raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son.
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch.
Beware the Jub-Jub bird and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand
Long time the manxome foe he sought
Till rested by the tum-tum tree
And stood awhile in thought.

And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock with eyes of flame
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood
And burbled as it came.

One-two! One-two! And through and through!
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack.
He left it dead and with its head
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock,
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Callooh! Callay! Oh, frabjous day!"
He chortled in his joy.

Twas brillig and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble on the wabe,
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome-raths outgrabe.
'Twas Barry and the Swansea Trapp
Did Gwalchmai Gwbert in the Porth;
All Merthyr were the Blaenavon
And the Caersws Aberporth.

Beware the Llanfairpwll my son
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Dolgellau and shun
Ffestiniog Ystrad.

He took his Talgarth sword in hand:
Long time the Maesteg foe he sought.
So rested he by the Tenby tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And as in Harlech thought he stood,
The Llanfairpwll, with eyes of flame,
Came Nefyn through Tredegar wood,
Beddgellert as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The Ebbw Vale went Clynog-fawr!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went Llanrwst Brynmawr.

And hast thou slain the Llanfairpwll!
Come to my arms, my Blaenporth boy!
O Fishguard day! Conwil! Conway!
He Llantwit in his joy.

'Twas Barry and the Swansea Trapp
Did Gwalchmai Gwbert in the Porth;
All Merthyr were the Blaenavon
And the Caersws Aberporth.

Peter H. Cole writes: I couldn't fit the full name "Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch"
in to the body of the poem, but have contracted it to its commonly abbreviated form.
Contrary to popular belief this is not actually the longest Welsh place name - that distinction
is held by "Gorsafawddacha'idraigodanheddogleddofionpenrhynareurdraethceredigion". The
meanings of these two ludicrous constructions are respectively: "Saint Mary's church in the
hollow of the white hazel near to the rapid whirlpool of Saint Tysilio of the red cave" and "The
Mawddach station and its dragon teeth at the Northern Penrhyn Road on the golden beach of
Cardigan Bay".

Somehow the alternative title -"Gorsafawddacha'idraigodanheddogleddollonpenrhynareurdraeth
ceredigioniwoci" didn't quite have the same ring to it (try saying that fast after a few pints!)

Copyright Peter H. Cole 2001


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