ODES - II.3 AN EQUAL MIND ...
Horace (Q. Horatius Flaccus) trans. John Conington
Aequam memento rebus in arduis
seruare mentem, non secus in bonis
ab insolentia temperatam
laetitia, moriture Delli,

seu maestus omni tempore uixeris,
seu te in remoto gramine per dies
festos reclinatum bearis
interiore nota Falerni.

Quo pinus ingens albaque populus
umbram hospitalem consociare amant
ramis? Quid obliquo laborat
lympha fugax trepidare riuo?

Huc uina et unguenta et nimium breuis
flores amoenae ferre iube rosae,
dum res et aetas et sororum
fila trium patiuntur atra.

Cedes coemptis saltibus et domo
uillaque flauus quam Tiberis lauit,
cedes et exstructis in altum
diuitiis potietur heres.

Diuesne prisco natus ab Inacho
nil interest an pauper et infima
de gente sub diuo moreris,
uictima nil miserantis Orci.

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
uersata urna serius ocius
sors exitura et nos in aeternum
exsilium impositura cumbae.
An equal mind, when storms o'ercloud,
Maintain, nor 'neath a brighter sky
Let pleasure make your heart too proud,
O Dellius, Dellius! sure to die,

Whether in gloom you spend each year,
Or through long holydays at ease
In grassy nook your spirit cheer
With old Falernian vintages,

Where poplar pale, and pine-tree high
Their hospitable shadows spread
Entwined, and panting waters try
To hurry down their zigzag bed.

Bring wine and scents, and roses' bloom,
Too brief, alas! to that sweet place,
While life, and fortune, and the loom
Of the Three Sisters yield you grace.

Soon must you leave the woods you buy,
Your villa, wash'd by Tiber's flow,
Leave, - and your treasures, heap'd so high,
Your reckless heir will level low.

Whether from Argos' founder born
In wealth you lived beneath the sun,
Or nursed in beggary and scorn,
You fall to Death, who pities none.

One way all travel; the dark urn
Shakes each man's lot, that soon or late
Will force him, hopeless of return,
On board the exile-ship of Fate.

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